City Journal Spring 2014

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Spring 2014
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Joe R. Hicks
What Hasn’t Changed « Back to Story

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Jesse and all the old skool jack@sses that have so much to lose by being out the spotlight continue to fan the flames of black racism. And here I had a dream too, that Hope-a-Dope Obama would take advantage of the opportunity to have a "historic, unprecedented" positive effect on the process, and instead fans the flames be being recklessly divisive. It's time for el Presidente to man up and stop missing an "unprecedented historic" opprotunity to heal and stand up and lead his people, rather than volley a constant salvo of negativism and blamesmanship. Did I mention he is "historic and unprecedented"?
I blame the media. Local television stations played and replayed the snippet that showed the LAPD using billy clubs on King-but rarely if ever the preceding segments showing King rising from the ground and throwing off multiple officers.

King was referred to as a "motorist," --instead of an ex-con on parole who refused to pull over for the CHP, refused to get down on the ground, and refused to stay down-even when tased.

The Seargent on scene was excoriated for allowing this to happen--but no one ever--until much later--pointed out that he probably saved King's life by refusing to allow a CHP officer to approach King with a loaded weapon.

No media mentioned that the Seargent had given mouth to mouth to a black AIDS victim once.

But the worst was the failure of the trial judge in Simi Valley to allow a televised trial. This was a case with rampant misconceptions, and the not guilty verdict allowed no time for the media to catch up.

The rush to judgment was even more unforgiveable since we ahd already seen that video does not give the whole picture (the Delorean arrest tape).

20 years later and the so-called "responsible" media has learned nothing. They rushed to judgment in the Duke lacrosse case, peddling every moronic utterance and speculation by talkig heads with no knowledge whatever. In the last 60 days, NBC made Zimmerman look like a racist, and ABC announced there was no injury on Zimmerman's head.

No wonder Los Angeles blacks were so angry. And the King case followed the accidental shooting of a black teenager by a Korean grocer, with probation for the grocer, that brought the black community to a low boil. Then the media irresponsibly stoked it with the King case. Like the worst elements ina community egging on a lynching.

The American Lawyer ran a thoughtful article months later on the theme that "Maybe the Simi Valley Jury was right," and it was better than any article in TIME or NEWSWEEK or the tediously PC LA Times.