City Journal Summer 2014

Current Issue:

Summer 2014
Table of Contents
Subscribe
Tablet Editions
Click to visit City Journal California

Readers’ Comments

Steven Malanga
Jersey’s Un-Super Bowl « Back to Story

View Comments (14)

Add New Comment:

To send your message, please enter the words you see in the distorted image below, in order and separated by a space, and click "Submit." If you cannot read the words below, please click here to receive a new challenge.

Comments will appear online. Please do not submit comments containing advertising or obscene language. Comments containing certain content, such as URLs, may not appear online until they have been reviewed by a moderator.


 
Showing 14 Comment(s) Subscribe by RSS
"We went to the local newspapers with the story, including the state-wide newspaper that now waxes apoplectic every day about Governor Christie and the George Washington Bridge story. None of them would touch it."

Of course not. Local papers are handmaidens of local establishments. They do not have the revenue to undertake 'investigative' reporting anymore, but they seldom did when they were cash flush.
New Jersey is a world unto itself.

A major garden apartment development was put up on the outskirts of my town in Central New Jersey over a decade ago. A large forest that had been there since colonial times was taken down to make way for the development. The first Spring after the development was completed and fully occupied an entire section of the town, located downhill from what had once been the forest, began to experience serious flooding - basements, sewers overflowing, underground springs and tributaries suddenly bursting to the surface, etc. Some of the homeowners, myself included, went first to the town hall, then the county administration, then the state, and finally to the EPA asking what kind of environmental impact studies were done before removing several thousand acres of heavily wooded areas. Each one gave us the runaround and told us to ask someone else. It turned out that none of the required studies were ever done, permits were perfunctorily issued by the county and the township to the well-connected Israeli firm that built and rented the apartment complex. We went to the local newspapers with the story, including the state-wide newspaper that now waxes apoplectic every day about Governor Christie and the George Washington Bridge story. None of them would touch it.

One of Woody Allen's characters in his early move, "Sleeper", was asked in the film if he believed in God. The character, obviously Allen himself, replied "I believe that there is an Intelligence that guides the universe. Except in parts of New Jersey".

Truer words were never spoken.
"In a recent report, the Mercatus Center described New Jersey as the least solvent state in the nation."

New Jersey should not be a state. There are three distinct and incongruous components to it. There should be three governments therein with only some filaments uniting them.
I seem to recall that the Republicans had a majority in the legislature during Thomas Kean's second term (1986-90). Chrispy Chreme isn't the negligent one here.
Let me see if I understand this. William Cahill, an attorney innocent of the business world who was on the public payroll about 60% of the time during the period running from 1937 to 1974, works out a deal which is supposed to promote 'economic development' but which turns into a rat hole and an insider scam. And this was not forseen?
And Christie has reformed NONE of this. A mainstream, WIFM Republican pretending to be a Conservative.
Sports......the 'other' crony capitalism.
New Jersey is and has been for generations a cash cow for Organized Crime and the politicians, law enforcement agencies, and news media who permit it to go on.
The HBO series, "The Sopranos", wasn't set in New Jersey because of the beautiful scenery in the Garden State.
> In a recent report, the Mercatus Center described New Jersey as the least solvent state in the nation. Is it any wonder why?
@ Ken Neilsen - I believe a handful of the Olympics were financially and culturally successful (Los Angeles, Vancouver, and Salt Lake City come to mind as well as possibly Atlanta).

The Staples Center in Los Angeles seems to have assisted in bringing people back to the center city as well. I lived in Santa Monica from 82-89 and worked downtown. There was no reason to stay past five O'Clock except to avoid traffic during those years. There must be other examples.
I remember arguing with my brother (a NJ resident) when this was proposed. He bought the argument that the stadium wouldn't cost anything since the racetrack profits would pay for it. I replied that NJ should take the track profits (which were real at the time) and use for something useful, not a stadium. I didn't realize that the racing industry would collapse so quickly.
It's all about milking the taxpayers dry and distributing the proceeds.
Why do politicians, all over the world, fall for this?
And why do taxpayers accept it?
Has there ever been a project like this - and I'll include sports events like the Olympics - that has delivered the promised benefits?
Pro Sports Team Owners: Today's Robber Barons.