City Journal.
City Journal Winter 2009.
City Journal Winter 2009.
Table of Contents
A quarterly magazine of urban affairs, published by the Manhattan Institute, edited by Brian C. Anderson.

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Green Cities, Brown Suburbs

Selected Responses:

Sent by Ken on 02-17-2009:

Build more skyscrapers? I guess you are for mandating where and how people should live? This of course is an affront to our way of life. If folks want to live in high-rise buildings, then they would be built. I agree that restrictions should be removed, but don't assume everyone wants to live in urban areas. I live outside of Detroit, and I can assure you that there is nothing "clean" or desirable about living there. You are glossing over many factors that relate to quality of life. I know of no one who would share your vision.

Sent by Mark on 02-17-2009:

It's interesting that Tampa is on the list. Its "downtown" - very small compared to other cities on the list - was traditionally a business-only district. Only in the last ten years has it been encouraged to development downtown for residential purposes. The downtown residential development has only been growing in the last five years, so in theory it would all be new and efficient. A similar development dynamic exists for St. Petersburg. Traffic is terrible here, but a few new business districts have appeared in the suburbs to attract businesses with an educated workforce nearby.

Good article.

Sent by Mark Barnes on 02-17-2009:

This article seems to completely ignore the factor of likely significant increases in solar and wind energy sources in the near future and new green building in all parts of the country. It also ignores urban quality of life. With more congestion, less sunlight and open space, cities could become much less desirable places to live. That has an impact on mental health as well.

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